Environment

‘Best chance’: Scientists, advocates divided over Murray-Darling future

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Debate over the viability of the $13 billion Murray Darling Basin Plan is likely to intensify in coming months as the region's drought deepens, scientists and stakeholders say.

Fears that the plan – backed by the Morrison government and the basin states of NSW, Queensland, Victoria and the ACT – could collapse from "unfair" criticism prompted almost two dozen researchers to issue a letter calling for its retention on Friday.

Lake Pamamaroo, part of the Menindee Lake System in western NSW, was all but dry by April this year.

Lake Pamamaroo, part of the Menindee Lake System in western NSW, was all but dry by April this year.Credit:Janie Barrett

"We worry that negative populist rhetoric may hold sway and derail the basin water reform process entirely," the letter stated, referring in particular to ABC's recent Four Corners report.

The missive rejected "myths" about the plan, including that irrigators were extracting more than before it began in 2012, that water efficiency projects funded by the governments were yielding little or no water savings, and that there had been no environmental benefits.

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Concern the plan risks collapse was "the core reason" for issuing the letter, said Rob Vertessy, a professor at the University of Melbourne's School of Engineering and also the chair of a science advisory committee for the Murray Darling Basin Authority.

"The Basin Plan is the best chance we've got to solve some really serious problems," he said

That view doesn't sway people like Graeme McCrabb, a grape grower near Menindee in far-western NSW who helped draw the nation's attention to a series of mass fish kills on the Darling River last summer.

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Fish, such as Murray cod, are continuing to turn up dead in parts of the river, he said.

"How can it be any worse if the Plan fails?" Mr McCrabb said on Friday. " We're on a downward spiral at Menindee, not an upward one."

More Murray cod are turning up dead on the Darling River about 70 kilometres downstream from Menindee.

More Murray cod are turning up dead on the Darling River about 70 kilometres downstream from Menindee.Credit:Graeme McCrabb

NSW's Deputy Premier and Nationals leader John Barilaro has also intensified his criticism of the plan, this week calling for a review of water entitlements for South Australia given communities in his state are running out of water amid record low inflows and new "worst conditions" in some valleys.

Such comments have angered some federal counterparts, with one insider calling them "a lot of bluster" and unhelpful given the prospect for a period of relative political calm. Elections in key states of NSW, Victoria and the Commonwealth aren't due again for three or more years.

David Littleproud, the Water Minister, said the Plan enjoyed the "solid support" of the National Farmers Federation, Landcare, the National Irrigators Council, and the Murray Basin Councils, among others.

“The facts speak for themselves – the Commonwealth Environmental Water Holder has secured around 2100 gigalitres because of the Plan,” he said.

The Murray-Darling Basin remains stuck in one of  the worst droughts in the past century.

The Murray-Darling Basin remains stuck in one of the worst droughts in the past century.Credit:Nick Moir

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