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Review: elegiac Star Trek: Picard brings all the feels in bittersweet finale

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  • Just a retired admiral and his trusty Number One. YouTube/CBS All Access
  • The character Picard's first impulse is to be comforting and safe. The show Picard's first impulse is to slowly tear down the sense of comfort and safety the audience starts with. CBS
  • Isa Briones plays Dahj and Soji Asha, Data's twin android daughters CBS All Access
  • Soji falls in love with a Romulan spy named Narek (Harry Treadaway) CBS All Access
  • Picard returns to a Romulan refugee planet, seeking assistance. CBS All Access
  • He convinces Elnor (Evan Evagora) to join his lost cause. CBS All Access
  • Elnor was rescued by Picard as a child, and is now a fierce warrior who never lies. CBS All Access
  • Dr. Agnes Jurati (Alison Pill) joins the mission. CBS All Access
  • Rafaella "Raffi" Musiker (Michelle Hurd) is a former Starfleet intelligence officer who served under Picard during the Romulan evacuation. CBS All Access
  • Picard also recruits Cristobal Rios (Santiago Cabrera), a thief and pilot of the spaceship La Sirena CBS All Access
  • Fellow space travelers CBS All Access
  • Picard finds Soji and convinces her to flee with him CBS All Access
  • Hey, it's Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan), a former Borg drone and series regular on Star Trek: Voyager CBS All Access
  • A bittersweet reunion with William Riker (Jonathan Frakes) and Deanna Troi (Marina Sirtis) CBS All Access
  • Soji bonds with Riker and Troi's daughter, Kestra (Lulu Wilson). CBS All Access

Nobody can deliver lines with Shakespearean gravitas and comforting emotional resonance like Patrick Stewart, which is why the actor—and his famous Star Trek character, Jean-Luc Picard—remain so beloved in the franchise. He gives yet another sublime performance in the new CBS All Access series, Star Trek: Picard, anchoring the larger-than-life stakes of the broader narrative with his intensely personal portrayal of a grief-stricken, disillusioned retired Starfleet admiral who feels the world he once dominated has passed him by.

(Some spoilers below, but no major reveals.)

As Ars' Kate Cox noted in her review of the pilot episode, the events of 2002's Star Trek: Nemesis "are the plot and emotional scaffolding over which the initial episode of Picard is draped"—most notably, Data sacrificing his life to save the rest of the Enterprise crew. Honestly, that loss drives the entire season, along with 2009's Star Trek film reboot of the franchise.

That film set up an alternate timeline, caused by the Romulan star going supernova, in which Picard led a massive humanitarian relocation effort for the roughly 900 million Romulan inhabitants. But then rogue synthetics mysteriously revolted and destroyed the Starfleet armada that had been evacuating the Romulans. Against Picard's passionate pleas, Starfleet reneged on its humanitarian mission and banned all synthetics, prompting a disillusioned and heartbroken Picard to resign.

Set 20 years after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis, the series opens with Picard having retired to the family vineyard. His bucolic existence is interrupted by the arrival of a mysterious woman named Dahj (Isa Briones), who pleads for his help. Alas, Picard fails to save her: she is killed in front of him by Romulan assassins belonging to a radical sect known as the Zhat Vash. Picard discovers that Dahj was actually a synthetic, technically Data's "daughter," and she has a twin sister, Soji, who is also in danger.

Resolved to save Soji, Picard asks Starfleet for a ship, but he's been gone a long time, and his entreaties are rebuffed. Never one to admit defeat, Picard amasses his own scrappy crew over the next few episodes for his unauthorized rescue mission: Christobal (Santiago Cabrera), a skilled thief and pilot of the ship La Sirena; Raffi (Michelle Hurd), a former Starfleet intelligence officer and recovering addict; Dr. Agnes Jurati (Alison Pill); and a Romulan refugee, Elnor (Evan Evagora).

Meanwhile, Soji is working at a Romulan reclamation site within a decommissioned Borg cube. She becomes romantically involved with a Romulan named Narek (Harry Treadaway), who is secretly a member of the Zhat Vash. His mission is to seduce Soji in an attempt to discover the location of her home planet, with the ultimate goal of destroying all the synthetics there.

Waxing nostalgic

Showrunner (and longtime Star Trek fan) Michael Chabon is perhaps best known as a gifted novelist. So it's not surprising that Picard has the slow-moving, contemplative feel of a novel, serialized for the small screen. (There actually is an official prequel novel, The Last Best Hope, by Una McCormack, depicting the events that drove Picard to resign from Starfleet after the destruction of Romulus. There is also a six-minute "Short Trek" prequel that details the Martian attack by synthetics.)

In other words, it's a very deliberate departure from past Star Trek series, including Picard's streaming sibling, Star Trek: Discovery. Co-creator Alex Kurtzman has said his goal was to create "a more psychological show, a character study about this man in his emeritus years." That's what convinced Patrick Stewart to sign on to reprise his iconic role.

But it's also what some hardcore Star Trek fans, accustomed to fast-moving, more episodic plots, might find frustrating. It's a complicated narrative structure, with multiple plot threads and several flashbacks. The tone is darker, and (at least in earlier episodes) more world-weary and cynical, in keeping with the psychological journey of its grief-stricken titular character. Starfleet, and the Federation, which once nobly embraced diversity and unity among species in the galaxy, are now indifferent to the plight of Romulan refugees and openly hostile to synthetics. No wonder the idealistic Picard seems so broken at the outset.

  • TNG fans will remember Hugh (Jonathan Del Arco) as a former Borg drone. CBS All Access
  • Seven of Nine must plug back into the decommissioned Borg cube (aka the Artifact) CBS All Access
  • Elnor hasn't quite mastered the whole secret disguise thing. CBS All Access
  • Seven of Nine is out for blood. CBS All Access
  • Brent Spiner appears not only as Data, but also as Altan Inigo Soong, who is a surrogate father to the synthetics on Coppelius. CBS All Access
  • Another of Data's synthetic descendants. CBS All Access Read More – Source