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Britain to scorch in 24C heat TODAY

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BRITONS are bracing for temperatures to rise to a scorching 24C today following a miserable week of heavy rain and thunder.24C

Todays forecast is likely to contain warm periods but also showers which could be thundery. The heaviest ones probably affect the south-west and Scotland, whereas locally temperatures could reach 24C (75F), hot weather charts from Net Weather have revealed. Today’s forecast on Weather Outlook said: “There will be warm periods but also showers which could be thundery.

“The heaviest ones probably affect the south-west and Scotland.

“Locally temperatures could reach 24C (75F).”

According to the Met Office, across the UK there will be cool and grey weather in the northeast with rain at times before the sun shines.

With a slightly brighter spell further south and west with some sunshine but also showers.

These will particularly come for north Wales and northwest England where they could be thundery.

But for those living in the south-west, it could be slightly cloudier with a chance of rain.

When moving further on into Saturday evening, it is still likely to stay grey along the east coast with some rain and drizzle.

This means that any showers or thunderstorms in the evening will tend to fade, leaving clear spells and just the odd shower for most.

Low cloud, mist and drizzle will continue to affect north-eastern areas.

Showers dying out for most elsewhere but a few persisting over southern and central England and Wales.

As the UK moves into Sunday, itll be another warm day for most, with sunny spells.

However, Wales, western England and Northern Ireland are likely to experience light showers, but remaining largely cloudy and dull in the north-east.

Forecasters at Weather Outlook added: “Sunday brings sunny spells but there will be showers.

“Again they could be heavy and thundery. Despite that, some places miss them and have a fine day.

“Warm in the sun with temperatures climbing into the mid 20Cs.”

On Monday, it will another warm day with some sunny intervals for most but thundery showers look to break out again in the west.

“The warm and showery conditions continue on Monday. The heaviest showers may be in northern and eastern Britain, but once more they will be hit and miss,” according to Weather Outlook.

The further outlook from Monday to Wednesday will consist of rather cool and cloudy across coastal districts in the northeast with mist and drizzle.

For Tuesday and Wednesday, much of the UK looks to see a mixture of sunny spells and slow-moving showers, some of which are likely to be heavy and thundery.

Weather Outlook added: “At this stage, the rest of the week looks changeable. Some warm sunny periods are expected but there is a likelihood of showers or longer periods of rain at times.”

This will be welcomed news for many in the UK as last week Britain was subjected to heavy showers, strong gales and colder temperatures.

It was thought that the deep low-pressure system had come from the south of Scandinavia and brought with it rain, thunderstorms and heavy winds.

The forecast came after Boris Johnson urged the public not to move gatherings indoors if it rains, as the weather turned wetter on Wednesday – a stark contrast to last months clear skies and high temperatures.

Over the past month, temperatures have reached 29C (84.2F) as the nation recorded its sunniest spring since records began in 1929.

A Met Office yellow warning for rain had been issued until 2pm yesterday, affecting towns and cities including Newcastle upon Tyne, Middlesbrough and Scarborough.

BBC Weather said on a statement on its website: “It will be warm for most with some sunny spells.

However, showers and thunderstorms look to break out, especially for Wales and north-west England. North-eastern areas will be largely cloudy and dull.

“Any showers or thunderstorms in the evening will tend to fade, leaving clear spells and just the odd shower for most.

“Low cloud, mist and drizzle will continue to affect north-eastern areas.”

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